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Use twitter to find new job vacancies

Twitter is awesome for finding new jobs

When speaking to people about what tools they use to search for job openings I will always get the usual answers in Linkedin, Indeed, Totaljobs, Monster, Reed, Newspapers & Industry Magazines etc but surprisingly not many people say Twitter.

Twitter is probably the most underutilised tool when it comes to job searching, every day we tweet out new jobs and we use twitter a lot to find businesses that are recruiting to introduce to our job board.  There are literally thousands of jobs being added to twitter every day and very rarely do you see people connecting with the hiring company to find out more information, well not on the feed anyway.

It took me ages to figure twitter out and to be honest I am still not one hundred percent on top of all the twitter etiquette but one thing I can teach you all is how to search for these jobs on a daily basis.

Twitter is best used as a search tool in my opinion and so many companies are tweeting information out using hashtags and these are a great way to start searching  for new job openings on the social media platform.

 

The first option is to go to www.twitter.com and in the search bar at the top of the webpage type in something like #cornwalljobs ( I am from Cornwall so using Cornwall as an example, if you are in a different area then use your local county or city instead ie #bristoljobs or #cheshirejobs etc)

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You will see in the image above that it will bring up all of the jobs that employers have tweeted out with that hashtag in it.  Make sure you click on the latest tab at the top of the page so you get all of the latest jobs coming up first and then ascending in date order.

You will now see a list of the latest job vacancies , each tweet will normally have a link to their website or a job board page where you can read more about the vacancy and learn more about the hiring company.

 

The second option for you is to search for the hashtags #hiring or #recruiting , now these ones are a bit more generic and you will get a list of tweets from companies from all around the world so you will need to filter these tweets down to your local areas.  If you click on the More tab you will get a few options to help you filter the tweets, as you will see by the picture below there are options for “From people you follow” and “Near you” that will help you refine the list of jobs down to a more digestable level.

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The third and more advanced level is using a free twitter tool called Twitter Advanced Search, some of you may already know of the website but for those who do not it is a website search tool that can help you search for specific things within twitter using keywords and dates etc.  Just type in Twitter Advanced Tools in to Google or your favourite web browser and the page will come up, click on the link and you will be presented with a screen like this…

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Now please do not be alarmed by this screen, it is not confusing it is dead easy to use to search for jobs, I literally use 3 of the options to narrow down the search to find a list of jobs in a specific area.

The 3 boxes that I use are “All of these words”, “Places” and “Dates”, that’s it.  You can see below the words I have used to search for jobs in a specific area within a specific timeline, you can be more accurate with your searching  if you like but I am just showing you the easy way to find a list of jobs like the one below.

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Once you have filled in the search boxes with the information you are keen to find you will again end up with a list of jobs within a specific area and timeline for you to read through and apply for.  Again make sure you click om the latest jobs tab so you can go through them in date order.

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I really can not recommend using twitter in your job searching enough, thousands of companies daily are tweeting out jobs and as it is underutilised it could give you an advantage in finding jobs over the people who are not using it as it will mean there is less competition if you get your application in quickly.

Anyway, I hope this blog post helps you in your job search, there are many tools to use to find a new job but by implementing twitter in to your search I feel that you will find a whole host of jobs that you would not find using any other tools.

If you have any questions about using twitter to find a job then ask away in the comments or chat to us on Twitter or Facebook.

Click here to view our job listings and start applying for jobs



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First Impressions: How to write an email cover letter that will help you to stand out from the very start

First impressions are important in so many aspects of our lives and it is arguably no more important than when you are applying for a new job.

You’re cover letter/email will be your chance to make a good first impression on your potential future employer.  The challenge of the email cover letter is to sell yourself and get the employer to take action and read your attached cv.

So many people get this wrong, I see some cringeworthy email cover letters every day and to be painfully honest if I was recruiting and receiving emails like this…

“I am interested in part time work, my cv is attached”

Or

“Please consider me for your current vacancy, I have attached my cv”

Or

“I am looking for full time work, please contact me with more details of your vacancy”

then I would just click on the delete button and I would never know just how good that candidate would be for our vacancy.  Why would I employ someone who can not follow a simple instruction? The instruction being to write a “cover letter” and attach your cv, not just state that you are looking for work.

It is crucial to get this part of the process right and make that first impression, you are competing with many other people for the same position so you have to make yourself stand out throughout the whole process.  This post will hopefully help you get it right from the very start

1 – Write a creative header

If you want to grab the hiring manager’s attention then this is your chance to sell yourself in one sentence.  He or she will receive lots of emails that just state a job id number or say “applying for ……”.   Instead of doing the same thing that the majority of people will do try something like “Admin Assistant with 10 years experience, awesome with Word and Excel and seeking a new opportunity”  In one sentence you are telling the employer that you have the right skills for their vacancy, he or she will then have to take the next step and open the email to read more.

2 – The first paragraph, The job you are applying for.

After the general salutations of “Dear ….” the opening paragraph should be short and to the point. Explain what job it is you are applying for and where you found the vacancy.

Always mention where you saw the job vacancy (e.g. ‘as advertised on proper-jobs.co.uk’) or, if someone referred you for the position then mention their name in this section.

Example: 
I would like to apply for the role of Office Administrator, currently being advertised on proper-jobs.co.uk. Please find attached my CV for your consideration.

3 – The second paragraph, why you are suitable for the position.

Briefly describe the relevant experience, skills, qualifications or personal attributes that make you suitable for the vacancy (ensure you refer to some of the skills listed in the job description).

Example:
As you will see from my attached CV, I have 10 year’s experience as an office administrator, I am organised and very confident using Microsoft tools such as word, excel, PowerPoint and outlook.

4 – The third paragraph, what you can bring to the team.

To get an idea of what to write here thoroughly read the job description, a good job description will tell you exactly what they are looking for. Use practical examples to emphasise what you can do for the company. You might be repeating some of your duties and responsibilities from your cv but it will let the hiring manager know what you can bring to the team, don’t put all of your duties just the main ones, it will give the hiring manager a reason to look at your cv for more information.

Example:
In my current role as Office Administrator for ……… I am responsible for the collection and processing of incoming mail, the scanning, storing and filing of documents, taking accurate telephone messages and dealing with telephone enquiries and assisting with other general administrative duties.   I feel that the skills I have gained from my current employer will help me hit the ground running within your team.

5 – The closing paragraph, thanks and sign off.

All you need to do here is thank the employer for their time and indicate that you would like to meet with the employer for an interview to discuss your application in my detail.

Sign off your email cover letter with ‘Yours sincerely’ (if you know the name of the hiring manager)/’Yours faithfully’ (if you do not), and your name.

Example:
Thank you for your time and consideration, I hope to meet with you soon to discuss my application in more detail.

Yours sincerely,

[Your name]

Conclusion

Remember: This is just a guide, not a ready-made email cover letter. Without research into the organisation advertising the position, and without tailoring the contents of your email to the role, it will lack the impact with which an email cover letter can drastically improve your chances of reaching the interview stage.

Click here to view our job listings and start applying for jobs



How to research for an interview

To give yourself the edge, research the employer organisation and interviewers before a job interview. In this age of the Internet and business networking, it’s getting increasingly easier to do this.

Interviewers will expect you to have some knowledge of the organisation before you meet them. By researching the interviewers as well, you’ll know what to expect from them, and what they expect from you.

If you don’t know who your interviewers will be, call the person who invited you to the interview and ask them.

How to get all the company info you need

1. Start with the job description

The organisation will expect you to have read through the job specification before you apply, let alone before the interview. Check it thoroughly and glean information on your department or function area.

What are the recruiters really looking for? How do your skills and experience match up to that?

2. Use the Internet

Go to the company’s website and read up on it. Browse other sites – like news sites and social networks – for other mentions of the company. What products/services do they offer? What is their reputation like?, who are their competitors?

3. Read the small print

While visiting their  website, check out Investor Relations and the sitemap. You’ll be surprised at how much useful information you can get there.  See how the company is performing and what the turnover / share price is.  Gain that little extra insight to shine above the rest.

4. Connect through LinkedIn

Use LinkedIn to find people within the business, what they do and perhaps they’re happy to have a chat with you. Check your own connections and even your shared connections for greater access to people.

5. Watch the news

Look for mentions of the organisation or your interviewers in the press. Where has the business been mentioned, what for and with whom?  What are the latest developments in the company and which areas are they focusing in on?

If your interviewers are quoted anywhere, what do the quotes reveal about them? How does the article describe the interviewers’ roles within the company? Does it tell you anything about their background history?

6. Get on the phone

Call the company’s HR department or reception and ask about the company, the role, the department, and how the business is going.  Sometimes you’ll be amazed at how much information they have and are willing to share.  They could even send you some brochures.

7. What does your agency know?

If you found the job vacancy through a recruitment agency, ask the following questions:

  • What do you know about my interviewers?  What’s their role and their style?
  • What’s going on in the business at the moment?
  • What are they looking for specifically?
  • Why has the agency put me forward for the job?
  • Have other candidates been sent? How many?
  • If so, what happened? What was asked, expected, what went well/wrong?
  • Is the company hiring in other areas?
  • Why are they hiring?

By doing some proper research, you’ll go into the interview prepared, feeling more relaxed and confident. The interviewers will not only pick up on the fact that you’ve done your homework, but also that you’re calm and approaching the experience with the right attitude.

Proper-Jobs / How to research for an interview

5 Reasons why you should upload your CV to our CV Database

Kernowjobs website offers the facility to upload your CV to the site in order that recruiters and employers can search for suitable candidates to hire as well as also giving you a much easier way to send your C.V when you see a job entry that you wish to apply for, as your C.V is already uploaded and means it can be much easier to apply for jobs from just about any location.

There are a number of advantages also to having your C.V on our CV Database that I will outline in this article.

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1. EASE OF ACCESS & APPLICATION

The biggest benefit to having your C.V online is that your C.V is so easy to access from just about anywhere, so you could be on the bus, looking on a job site, and could apply in full from your phone, as your C.V is already uploaded to the site. This also makes a handy reference point should you require a look at your C.V on the move, for example on the way to a job interview, to refresh your memory.

2. EMPLOYERS & RECRUITERS CAN LOOK FOR YOU

Another huge advantage of having your C.V online is that recruiters and employers will have access to the file, meaning that they can actively seek you out on the site if they think you are suitable for a job that they have available. This is the main reason to ensure that your contact details should be kept up to date. Bear in mind that if you have your C.V online and you receive a call from an unknown number, it may be a possible job opportunity.

3. JOBS CAN FIND THEMSELVES

With our Job Alerts you can tailor search terms so that keywords on your C.V will forward relevant job matches to your inbox, you can choose your preferences based on keywords, locations or categories and when a job appears on the job board with your chosen words then the job will automatically be emailed to you.  Having a C.V online can really take a lot of the stress out of job hunting and saves you time to do other things.

4. CHOP AND CHANGE

Having your C.V online also means you can tailor your C.V into many different formats so that you can use different versions of your C.V and send over the most relevant version of your C.V to the job you are applying for. This would give you the advantage of ensuring that your C.V will stand out to the recruiter.

5. COVER LETTERS ON DEMAND

You can also upload covering letters or have those stored on many of the sites, which means you are always prepared to apply for the jobs that catch your eye! Again you can ensure that the cover letters are tailored to each particular type of job that you are applying for.

So go ahead and create as many C.V’s as you wish and upload them to the main job sites, and then sit back and see how much easier job hunting can be when your C.V is already accessible to yourself and recruiters.

How to write an effective job description that will get you more applications

Finding and attracting the right people at all levels of an organisation in what is an increasingly competitive job market is vital and this is only expected to intensify as the economy recovers fully. Getting the job description right is therefore essential but not without its challenges, not least in the time required to do so among competing priorities.

 

There are a number of key areas a good “Job Description” should cover, and when writing one  it is important to be specific and honest as this will pay dividends in the long run.

Job Title & Summary: Develop a job title for the position you’re looking to fill — the title and level (assistant, senior, lead, etc.) should accurately reflect the work that the employee will perform and conveys the culture of the organisation. Try to write the job description using a writing style that matches your company’s ethos as it will appeal more to the type of people you are looking for.

Key Responsibilities: List all of the essential functions of the position at hand. Typically, this includes between five and ten responsibilities. Each responsibility should begin with a present-tense, action verb, e.g. “research social media trends”. This list should help applicants to gain an idea of what a typical day in the role might be like so be as accurate as possible about what percentage of the employee’s time will be spent fulfilling each task.  Write these out using bullet points instead of writing block text, it makes it much easier to read and will keep the reader’s attention for longer.

Department & Supervisor: Include details of who the person would report to and where that person falls within the company’s structure.

Skills & Qualifications: List all qualifications that are mandatory, along with any that are preferred. This should include skills, technical or language for example; years of experience; qualifications; licenses and education level if appropriate.  Again use bullet points for this section to make it easier to read, this will keep the reader’s attention better.

Company Overview: Candidates find it helpful to have a description of the company which gives information about the company’s mission and goals at hand, in addition to what they can find themselves on the company’s website or from its social media presence if any. Details of the company’s presence, number of employees, products sold and HQ location can also be useful in presenting your organisation well.

 

Location: Include details on where the position is located. If travel is necessary, note what percentage of time the employee will spend travelling and where he or she will be travelling to.

Type of Employment: Be very clear about whether the position is full-time or part-time, temporary, permanent, seasonal or contract.

Salary Range & Benefits: Include a salary range and any benefits such as bonuses, company car schemes, home-working, gym memberships, travel costs, health insurance, pension, team building outings etc etc.  The more attractive you can make this section look the better.

Last but not least do not forget to include the vital contact details for more information and details of how to apply.

This covers written job descriptions however as we move in to a more social media driven era then you should consider adding photos of the workplace and team so people can see what the workplace is like and who the team members are.

Job vacancy videos are also something that companies are using more and more nowadays, these videos are an excellent way to show people what it is like to work for your company, getting your company brand across to the viewers.  If the hiring manager is making the video then people can see what the manager is like first hand before even meeting him or her. These are all key things a job seeker wants to know and these videos get the message across before any interviews. Keep an eye out for a feature I will do on this soon as I believe they will be the standard in the not so distant future.

10 GREAT questions to ask at an interview An interview is a two way process, If you have been invited in for an interview for a position you have applied for then you will know that you have some relevant skills for the postion, but will the position or company for that matter be suitable for you? You will have already done your homework on the company inviting you in for the interview so how do you find out the nitty gritty details that you want to know about the company, manager and team? You find out by preparing some well thought out questions to ask the hiring manager during the interview.

interviewTowards the end of an interview the hiring manager will normally ask if you have any questions about the company, the particular role or team etc.  We really recommend not asking questions like “How much will I get paid?”, “How many days holiday days will I get off in the year?”, “Do you offer sick pay?” or “Will I get a company car?” etc.  These sort of questions will not get you anywhere, all these details will be discussed at a later date should you get past the first interview of course. You will already know what the company offers in the way of products and services through the preparation and you will probably have read or talked to the hiring manager about the company history and structure so there is no need to ask questions on this either (Unless you want something clarifying of course). Use these questions to find out the details you need to give you an idea of what it would be like to work for this company, with this team and just as importantly with the hiring manager, after all he or she will be your boss if you get the job.

  • How would you describe a typical working day/week for this particular position?
  • What challenges will the new post holder face?
  • What are the teams strengths and weaknesses?
  • What are the teams goals over the next tear? …. and 5 years?
  • What does the company offer in the way of personal development and skill sharpening?
  • How does the company reward or recognise outstanding work and excellence?
  • How would your team describe you as a manager?
  • What makes this company stand apart from the competition?
  • How would you describe your ideal candidate for this position?
  • How do I compare to the other people you have interviewed so far?

You will notice all of these questions begin with a what or a how, these types of questions will keep the hiring manager talking and as long as you can build a good rapport throughout the interview then the hiring manager will see you have good preparation and communication skills. You do not have  to ask all of these questions and you do not have to ask them in the written way, they are a guide.  You will find the questions you will want to ask by reading through job descriptions, company websites and brochures and by even talking to other people who work for the organisation. Bear in mind that it is just as important for you to know that the company is right for you as it is for the company to know you are right for them and a good line of questions will certainly help you make up your mind about the company and position that you are interviewing for.

If you are thinking about using a potential employer’s job offer to get your current company to counter and pay you more money then you should stop thinking about it straight away.  Using another job offer as a bargaining chip may be tempting, but too often, it ends badly. If you want a raise, then negotiate it on your own merits–or prepare to move on. Here are a few reasons why:

1. Employers often make counter offers in a moment of panic. (“We can’t have Steve leave right now! We have that big target to hit next month.”) But after the initial relief passes, you may find your relationship with your employer, other managers and co workers has fundamentally changed. You’re now the one who was looking to leave. You’re no longer part of the inner circle, and you might be at the top of the list if your company needs to make cutbacks in the future.

2. Even worse, the company might just want time to search for a replacement, figuring that it’s only a matter of time until you start looking around again. You might turn down your other offer and accept your employer’s counter offer only to find yourself pushed out soon afterward. In fact, the rule of thumb among recruiters is that 70 to 80 percent of people who accept counter offers either leave or are let go within a year.

3. There’s a reason you started job-searching in the first place. While more money is always a motivator, more often, there are also other factors that drove you to look: personality fit, dislike of your boss, boredom with the work, lack of recognition, too far to travel, under paid, insane deadlines etc.  Those factors aren’t going change, and will likely start bothering you again as soon as the glow from your raise wears off.

4. Even if you get more money out of your company now, think about what it took to get it. You needed to have one foot out the door to get paid the wage you wanted, and there’s no reason to think that future salary increases will be any easier. The next time you want a raise, you might even be refused altogether on the grounds that “we just gave you that big increase when you were thinking about leaving.”

5. You may be told to take the other offer, even if you don’t really want it–and then you’ll have to follow through. Using another offer as a bluff is a really dangerous game.

6. Good luck getting that new employer to ever consider you again. If you go all the way through their hiring process only to accept a counter offer from your current employer, then the former is going to be wary of offering  you any opportunities in the future. If it’s a company you’d like to work with, you might be shutting a door you would rather keep open.

Are there times where accepting a counter offer makes sense and works out? Sure, there are always exceptions. But it’s a bad idea frequently enough that you should be very, very cautious before doing so.